Dustin Johnson

Man joins FDNY to honor bullied cousin who killed self while stationed in Afghanistan

RANDALLS ISLAND, New York (WABC) — One of the newest members of the FDNY’s probationary firefighter class graduated Wednesday in honor of his cousin who took his own life 10 years ago because of bullying.For probationary firefighter Banny Chen, it was a grit and determination born from sorrow and pain. Every turn of the hydrant […]

 Dustin Johnson

TPOTY- The leading global travel photography award

The 2021 Travel Photographer of the Year (TPOTY) awards are open for entries. Run by photographers for photographers, TPOTY is truly global – wherever you live in the world and whether you are amateur or professional, beginner or expert, young or old, Travel Photographer of the Year is for you! We have new categories and […]

 Dustin Johnson

Safe Link Converter

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 Dustin Johnson

Brazzers – Real Wife Stories – Jasmine James Skyler Mckay Danny D and Keiran Lee

Brazzers – Real Wife Stories – Jasmine James Skyler Mckay Danny D and Keiran Lee – The Dinner Invitation 8 min 720p <a href=”https://static-hw.xvideos-cdn.com/v3/js/i18n/xvplayer/english.js”>https://static-hw.xvideos-cdn.com/v3/js/i18n/xvplayer/english.js</a><a href=”https://static-hw.xvideos-cdn.com/v-0b935663c20/v3/js/skins/min/player.html5hls.static.js”>https://static-hw.xvideos-cdn.com/v-0b935663c20/v3/js/skins/min/player.html5hls.static.js</a> Source

 Dustin Johnson

A grieving small community shows how big of an impact Sheriff Danny Heath had on them

Jones County Sheriff Danny Heath was elected in 2010. A community that prides itself on being small and tightknit got a little smaller with Monday night’s news, but their reaction shows just how big of an impact the loss had on them.  Jones County officials announced Monday that Sheriff Danny Heath had passed away, while canceling a Jones […]

 Dustin Johnson

Fahey Klein Gallery

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 Dustin Johnson

20th CENTURY BROADWAY AND BEYOND: A CHRONOLOGY, 1900-1949 [See also sidebar link above: American theatre at the turn of the century.] February 5, 1900: Broadway audiences at the Madison Square Garden Theatre are scandalized by the play Coralie & Company, Dressmakers, in which a white man is discovered in bed with a black woman. On the same night, Sapho, opens at Wallack’s Theatre and causes enough stir that the police close the production a month later and bring both the show’s producer and the star, Olga Nethersole, to trial. Objections stem from the sexual overtones of actor Hamilton Revelle carrying Nethersole upstairs to an unseen bedroom. The production is permitted to resume on April 7th and has several revivals. June, 1900: William Gillette and Arthur Conan Doyle’s play Sherlock Holmes finally closes, after a popular run of 256 performances. Gillette also stars as the famous detective. The play is revived four more times by 1915, each time with Gillette in the lead. September 6, 1900: The famous vaudeville comedy team of Joseph Weber and Lew Fields produce a hit musical burlesque, Fiddle-dee-dee, which runs for 262 performances at their Weber and Fields’ Broadway Music Hall. They follow up with a string of shows with silly names, including Hoity Toity (1901), Twirly Whirly (1902), and Whoop-Dee-Doo (1903) among others. September 27, 1900: Oscar Hammerstein, grandfather to the famous lyricist of the same name, opens the Theatre Republic on 42nd Street between 7th and 8th Avenue. It becomes Minsky’s Burlesque house in the 1930s, then a movie theatre called the Victory, showing XXX-rated movies in the 1970s. The theatre is renovated in the early 1990s as the New Victory and used for family-oriented theatre productions, reopening in 1995. November and December, 1900: Famous French actress Sarah Bernhardt tours, performing five productions in repertory on Broadway: Hamlet, Cyrano de Bergerac, La Tosca, La Dame aux Camelias, and L’Aiglon. She plays the title role of Hamlet as a breeches role (a woman dressed as a man), but critics found her ill-suited to the role. 1901: The star power continues to prevail on Broadway, with performers such as Maude Adams, E. H. Southern, Anna Held, Minnie Maddern Fiske (a.k.a. Mrs. Fiske), Ada Rehan, Maxine Elliot, Julia Marlowe, and the comedy duo of Weber and Fields, who’s musical burlesque Hoity Toity runs for 259 performances. Reportedly, Broadway has more legitimate theatres at this time than any other city in the world. February 4, 1901: Actress Ethel Barrymore, one of the great Barrymore family of actors, gains stardom at the age of twenty-one in a production of Clyde Fitch’s comedy, Captain Jinks and the Horse Marines. The Barrymore clan retains star status in the twenty-first century through actress Drew Barrymore. February 25, 1901: The performing family “The Four Cohans” moves from vaudeville to Broadway with the musical, The Governor’s Son, with book, music, and lyrics by George M. Cohan. Young George does not become a star in his own right until 1904 with Little Johnny Jones. January 1902: The British import musical, Florodora, achieves hit status with over 500 performances since its Broadway opening on November 10, 1900. Part of the success is attributed to the beautiful and flirtatious “Florodora Sextette” the chorus dancers. Featured dancer Evelyn Nesbit goes on to marry millionaire Harry Kendall Thaw, who murders architect Stanford White over Nesbit in the “Crime of the Century.” January 13, 1902: Mrs. Patrick Campbell, a respected British actress, made her Broadway debut at the Theatre Republic in a repertoire that included The Second Mrs. Tanqueray, Magda, The Happy Hypocrite, and Pelleas and Melisande. George Arliss also made his debut in these productions. February 27, 1902: Shakepeare’s comedy As You Like It opens and runs for 60 performances at Broadway’s Theatre Republic, a popular success. September 11, 1902: Comedy team Weber and Fields open another smash hit with their musical burlesque Twirly Whirly, which plays for 247 performances on Broadway. November 12, 1902: Respected performer, writer, and director Minnie Maddern Fiske directs and takes the title role in Mary of Magdala, a critical and popular success with over 100 performances at the Manhattan Theatre. The production is revived in the fall of 1903. 1903: Seventy-four year-old actor Joseph Jefferson III, descended from generations of American actors of the same name, tours the country in Dion Boucicault’s play, Rip Van Winkle, based on Washington Irving’s novel. Jefferson passes away in 1905, survived by his son Thomas Jefferson, who plays the title role in Rip Van Winkle on Broadway in 1905. January 20, 1903: A musical version of Frank Baum’s The Wizard of Oz finds Broadway success, but varies with the later movie version. In the original stage musical, Dorothy is accompanied not by Toto, but her pet cow, Imogene. The Wizard of Oz plays nearly 300 performances and is revived in 1904 later for an additional 171 performances. February 18, 1903: In Dahomey becomes the first all-black musical on Broadway, playing at the New York Theatre. The musical farce was based on an idea by African American vaudevillians George Walker and Bert Williams, who also starred in the production. The show later travels to England, where it becomes a novelty hit in London. September 24, 1903: Comedy team Weber and Fields open another hit in their string of musical extravaganzas at the Weber and Fields’ Broadway Music Hall. Whoop-Dee-Doo runs for 165 performances. The cast of more than fifty performers includes Weber and Fields as well as the hour glass-figured Lillian Russell. October 13, 1903: Victor Herbert’s musical extravaganza Babes in Toyland premieres on Broadway, running 192 performances. On November 16th, Herbert makes a second New York premiere with Babette, which runs only 59 performances. An extremely popular composer, Herbert gathers 50 additional Broadway credits (including revivals) by 1930. October 26, 1903: The New Amsterdam Theatre opens, an Art Nouveau jewel on West 42nd Street. The first production is Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, with music arranged by Victor Herbert. By 1913 it becomes the home of the Ziegfeld Follies. Disney renovates the 1,750 seat theatre to great acclaim in 1997. November 2, 1903: Only a week after the opening of the New Amsterdam Theatre, the Lyceum Theatre opens on West 45th Street. The decorative new theatre accommodates approximately 950 patrons and has an unusual ten-story tower in the rear with carpentry shops, paint shops, and wardrobe area as well as additional dressing rooms. In 1974 it becomes the first Broadway theatre to be declared a landmark. The architecture firm of Herts & Tallant designed both the New Amsterdam and the Lyceum. 1904: Broadway producers are looking to England and Europe for plays to import, and likely candidates were few and far between, opening the door for American playwrights. Statistics on the season are at odds. Variety reports the 1904-1905 season saw openings of 127 plays and musicals while the Dramatic Mirror calculates 313, but that includes touring productions playing Broadway, special engagements, and try out productions, among other special categories. 1904: Times Square (formerly Long Acre Square) is named in New York City, after the New York Times building on 42nd and Broadway. September 14, 1904: Popular star and director/producer Minnie Maddern Fiske revives her performance in Langdon Mitchell’s play Becky Sharpe, based on the novel Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray. Fiske is blacklisted by the theatre’s producers and ends the 1904 run prematurely, after 116 performances. She revives the play, again playing the lead of Becky, in 1911. October 4, 1904: The New York City subway opens, allowing audience members easy access to an evening’s entertainment. November 17, 1904: Peformer/composer/lyricist George M. Cohan becomes a star when his musical, Little Johnny Jones, premieres. One highlight of the show is Cohan singing his own composition, “Give My Regards to Broadway.” He goes on to write and perform in many hit Broadway musicals, earning him the title “ Father of the American Musical.” 1905: Rival producers the Shuberts battled the Theatrical Syndicate over who would own major theatres in the Broadway district. The Theatrical Syndicate, formed in 1896 and also known as “The Trust,” was a group of six producers with a monopoly on U. S. theatres. April 12, 1905: New York City’s Hippodrome, a 4,678 seat theatre, opens with a production called A Yankee Circus on Mars. The Hippodrome accommodates a high level of spectacle and features a large pool area for water ballets, sea battles, and other water spectacles. A production called The Raiders features “Plunging Horses” that dive into the pool. The water feature is removed in 1923, when the theatre is renovated as a vaudeville stage. October 23, 1905: Irish-born playwright George Bernard Shaw causes controversy when his play about prostitution, Mrs. Warren’s Profession, opens at the Garrick Theatre and plays only one performance. Shaw’s other plays in repertory that season at the Garrick include How He Lied to Her Husband, The Man of Destiny, You Never Can Tell, John Bull’s Other Island, and Candida. His highly-regarded Man and Superman also opens in 1905 and runs nearly 200 performances. November 6, 1905: James M. Barrie’s stage adaptation of Peter Pan opens on Broadway at the Empire Theatre, starring Maude Adams as Peter, the boy who won’t grow up. It is a hit and plays 223 performances as well as numerous revivals. November 14, 1905: Theatre impresario David Belasco opens Girl of Golden West at his Belasco Theatre on Broadway. He writes, directs and produces the drama, which is set in a California mining camp. It runs for more than 200 performances and is produced again in 1907 and 1908. Belasco quickly becomes known for his insistence on realistic production aspects. 1906: Provessor George Pierce Baker teaches “47 Workshop” at Harvard University, a playwriting workshop that inspires burgeoning dramatists and starts the trend toward the inclusion of theatre classes in the university curriculum. Baker starts teaching at Yale University in 1925, where he becomes director of the university theatre. 1906: At a time when immigrants have been steadily flooding into New York City, Paul Orleneff brings his theatre company from Moscow to open New York’s first Russian theatre on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. January 1, 1906: Writer/director/composer/performer George M. Cohan starts the year off by opening his new production, Forty-five Minutes from Broadway, at Broadway’s New Amsterdam Theatre. The prolific Cohan serves as writer/director/composer/performer for two more Broadway musicals that year: George Washington, Jr. and The Governor’s Son. He also writes music for the play Gallops and writes the comedy Popularity, both of which open on Broadway this year. Poor critical response to Popularity helps Cohan decide to pursue only musical theatre in the future. June 25, 1906: Millionaire Harry Kendall Thaw, husband of former Florodora dancer Evelyn Nesbit, murders New York architect Stanford White, reportedly for taking Nesbit’s virginity during the run of Florodora. Called “The Crime of the Century,” it sets New York City’s newspapers into high gear. October 5, 1906: William Vaughn Moody’s play The Great Divide opens at Broadway’s Princess Theatre and becomes a hit, playing 238 performances. Margaret Anglin and Henry Miller star, and Miller also directs and produces. October 17, 1906: Rachel Crothers’ first full-length Broadway play, The Three of Us, opens to excellent reviews and opening in London a year later. Crothers becomes a pioneering woman as a commercial playwright, director, performer, and producer of plays about women. December 4, 1906: George Broadhurst’s play The Man of the Hour opens at Broadway’s Savoy Theatre and becomes a hit, running for 479 performances. 1907: Theatre impresario George M. Cohan writes, composes, directs, and stars in two more new musicals on Broadway: The Honeymooners, which opens June 3rd at Aerial Gardens, and The Talk of New York (a sequel to Forty-five Minutes from Broadway), which opens December 3rd. He also revives Little Johnny Jones and George Washington, Jr. On a more personal note, Cohan marries his second wife, Agnes Nolan, a chorus girl from Little Johnny Jones, after divorcing performer Ethel Levey, who had once performed with his family in vaudeville and musicals. 1907: New York audiences have an easier time getting to and from productions when taxis begin running in the city. January 28,1907: After fifty years on the stage, highly regarded English star Ellen Terry makes her last Broadway appearance in three plays in repertory: Captain Brasshound’s Conversion, The Good Hope, and Nance Oldfield. She gives only lectures and readings in the U. S. thereafter. July 8, 1907: Producer Florenz Ziegfeld, Jr. produces his first Follies on Broadway on the roof of the New York Theatre. The Follies (renamed the Ziegfeld Follies in 1911) continue almost annually until 1931, and occasionally after Ziegfeld’s death in 1932. With his beautiful set of hand-picked chorus girls, Ziegfeld becomes known for “Glorifying the American Girl,” or more precisely, glorifying her body through glamorous, revealing costumes. August 31, 1907: Billie Burke, the future wife of Florenz Ziegfeld, Jr., makes a splash opposite John Drew in Michael Morton’s play My Wife. It runs for 129 performances. October 16, 1907: Theatre impresario David Belasco opens the Stuyvesant Theatre on West 44th Street in New York City, renaming it The Belasco in 1910. One of its unusual features is the penthouse he built for himself within the structure. October 21, 1907: Franz Lehár’s operetta, The Merry Widow, opens at the New Amsterdam Theatre on Broadway after its initial success in Europe. It becomes a hit and runs for nearly a year, with 416 performances. It remains popular for years to come, often touring or in revival, and is made into a movie in 1934, starring Maurice Chevalier and Jeanette MacDonald. 1908: Playwright/director/performer Rachel Crothers opens her play Myself-Bettina in Chicago. It was likely the first play she directed, making her an early pioneer among women directors in the United States. 1908: George M. Cohan again impresses Broadway audiences with a number of new musicals and plays. Fifty Miles from Boston opens February 3rd; one of Cohan’s famous songs, “Harrigan” emerges as a favorite and is still considered an American classic. On April 20th Cohan reunites his family, once a vaudeville performance team, to play in his new musical, The Yankee Prince. On October 5th he opens The American Idea, staring Trixie Friganza of vaudeville fame. He also finds time to produce and write for Cohan and Harris Minstrels, co-produced by Sam H. Harris, who continues as Cohan’s co-producer for years to come. January 2, 1908: The Merry Widow Burlesque opens at Weber’s Music Hall, poking fun at the popular operetta. It becomes a hit in its own right, playing 156 performances. June 15, 1908: “Shine on, Harvest Moon” becomes a hit song from Ziegfeld’s Follies of 1908, compliments of performer Nora Bayes, who co-wrote the song with her second husband, Jack Norworth. They recorded the song in 1910, and it has since become an American classic. In 1944 Warner Brothers release a movie based on Bayes’ life, entitled Shine on Harvest Moon. August 8, 1908: Novelist/playwrights Booth Tarkington and Harry Leon Wilson team up to write a Broadway comedy hit, The Man from Home, which opens at the Astor Theatre and plays nearly 500 performances. Tarkington and Wilson continue to collaborate successfully over the next several decades, writing ten more plays together. December 23, 1908: Peter Pan star Maude Adams headlines another hit by James M. Barrie, a comedy called What Every Woman Knows. It is a hit with 198 performances. 1909: Melodramas, which had toured the U.S. and were popular at the turn of the century, were dying out at this time. May 3, 1909: Actress Laurette Taylor makes her Broadway debut in The Great John Ganton, which opens at the Lyric Theatre. Taylor soon becomes a star, appearing on Broadway numerous times over nearly three decades. Her last Broadway role is as Amanda Wingfield in the premiere of Tennessee Williams’ Glass Menagerie in 1945. Taylor became known for her mood swings and her strong personality; reportedly, playwright Noel Coward was inspired to write his hit comedy, Hay Fever, after spending a weekend in her home. October 11, 1909: Theatre creator/performer George M. Cohan premieres a new musical called The Man Who Owns Broadway, based on his only true flop, the 1906 comedy Popularity. He reconfirms that his calling is musical theatre when the production runs 128 performances at the New York Theatre. His next production, The Fortune Hunter, helps propel leading actor, John Barrymore, to stardom. November 6, 1909: The New Theatre opens on Central Park West at West 62nd Street. Nicknamed the Millionaires’ Theatre because of its rich sponsors, the theatre was run by Winthrop Ames and the Shubert brothers. The first production was Antony and Cleopatra, starring Shakespearean actors Julia Marlowe and E. H. Sothern. November 22, 1909: Nine year-old actress Helen Hayes makes her Broadway debut in a musical farce called Old Dutch, which opens at the Herald Square Theatre. Her last Broadway role is in a revival of Mary Chase’s hit play Harvey in 1970. The following year, at the age of seventy, she wins an Academy Award for her supporting role in the movie Airport. Dubbed the First Lady of the American Theatre, Hayes’ career also includes radio, television, and film. Her list of awards is long and includes the first Tony Award ever granted for Outstanding Performance by an Actress in 1947 for Happy Birthday. A Broadway theatre is named after her in 1955, and when that theatre is demolished, another is named for her in 1983. 1910: Married Shakespearean actors Julia Marlowe and E. H. Sothern form the Sothern & Marlowe Repertory, the resident company of the New Theatre. They performed ten plays their first year, and they produce eight to thirteen Shakespeare plays in each repertory season until October of 1913. Marlowe takes the following season off because of illness, and her husband Sothern tours alone. Throughout the course of their careers, Marlowe and Sothern toured Shakepeare and classic plays around the United States. June 20, 1910: Ziegfeld’s Follies of 1910 opens at the Jardin de Paris on Broadway. The Follies star an African American performer for the first time: Bert Williams. Williams had already made a name for himself on Broadway in all black musicals such as In Dahomey and Abyssinia, and he had performed in minstrel shows with his partner George Walker, but it was controversial for an African American to appear on stage with a white cast. Under Ziegfeld, Williams becomes one of the highest paid performers on Broadway. Comedy legend Fanny Brice makes her debut in the Follies this year as well. Both Williams and Brice are featured stars in the Ziegfeld Follies for years to come. September 19, 1910: George M. Cohan finds he has a hit with his newest creation, the musical Get-Rich-Quick Wallingford, which plays more than 400 performances at the Gaiety Theatre on Broadway. Producers Cohan and Harris send several companies on tour, and soon it becomes popular with stock companies across the country. October 1, 1910: Belgian symbolist Maurice Maeterlinck’s play, The Blue Bird, opens at Broadway’s New Theatre and transfers to the Majestic Theatre on November 8th, where it remains until January of 1911. This eye-catching play blends symbolist and realist design styles. November 7, 1910: Victor Herbert’s operetta, Naughty Marietta, opens on Broadway and includes the popular song “Ah, Sweet Mystery of Life!” Naughty Marietta does well at the box office, running 136 performances. The operetta gains renewed fame when Nelson Eddy and Jeanette MacDonald star in the 1935 film version. December 5, 1910: French diva Sarah Bernhardt begins another of her many farewell tours, this time produced by her own Sarah Bernhardt Repertory Company. They perform twelve plays on Broadway in rotation at the new Globe Theatre on West 46th (later renamed the Lunt-Fontanne) and tour the U.S. 1911: This year sees a trend toward longer runs of productions at Broadway theatres. February 27, 1911: Everywoman, a modern adaptation of the medieval morality play Everyman, opens at the Herald Square Theatre and causes much discussion among the theatre-going public. The settings of the five-act play include Everywoman’s home, a metropolitan theatre, and New Year’s Eve on Broadway. The play enjoyed a long run of 189 performances. March 20, 1911: One of Broadway’s new spectacular theatres opens: The Winter Garden on Broadway and West 50th Street. Run by producers J. J. and Lee Shubert, the original design embodies an English garden, with lattices on the walls and trellises over the audience’s heads. Another unusual feature is a runway extending from the stage to the back of the house, bringing performers near the audience. The opening night performance features singer Al Jolson. June 19, 1911: Sixty-nine year-old French actress Sarah Bernhardt ends a cross-country tour on Broadway, playing only four performances: Jean Marie / Sister Beatrice, L’Aiglon, La Femme X, and La Dame aux Camelias. June 26, 1911: Producer Florenz Ziegfeld, Jr. produces another Follies, officially adding his name to the title for the first time: The Ziegfeld Follies of 1911. Yiddish comedienne and torch singer Fanny Brice is back, as is African American performer Bert Williams. Ziegfeld’s famous chorines are as popular as ever, as is Lillian Lorraine, a featured performer who became his mistress for a number of years. September 11, 1911: Female impersonator Julian Eltinge stars in The Fascinating Widow at New York’s Liberty Theater. Eltinge is one of the highest paid actors of the time and has a Broadway theatre named for him in 1912 (a.k.a. the Empire Theatre). September 18, 1911: George Arliss plays the title role of Disraeli, based on the life of England’s 19th century Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli. The play becomes a Broadway success, with 280 performances and kudos for Arliss. September 26, 1911: George Broadhurst’s play Bought and Paid For opens and becomes the hit of the Broadway season at the Playhouse Theatre, running 431 performances. November 20, 1911: Irish playwright John Synge’s Playboy of the Western World premieres on Broadway, produced by the Irish Players. Author Daniel Blum reports, “[T]here was quite a disturbance in the gallery when partisan Irishmen showed their objections to certain lines by throwing potatoes.” 1912: With a gathering political storm in Europe, Broadway audiences continue to enjoy comedies, musicals, and other light entertainments. The trade newspaper Variety counts 162 Broadway productions in the 1912 – 1913 season, up twenty-two shows from the 1911

20th CENTURY BROADWAY AND BEYOND: A CHRONOLOGY, 1900-1949 [See also sidebar link above: American theatre at the turn of the century.] February 5, 1900: Broadway audiences at the Madison Square Garden Theatre are scandalized by the play Coralie & Company, Dressmakers, in which a white man is discovered in bed with a black woman. On […]

 Dustin Johnson

Country Music – Music News, New Songs, Videos, Music Shows and Playlists from CMT

Playlists CMT Next Women of CountryHear music from country’s female stars of tomorrow — today. Listen CMT MusicCatch up on the latest and greatest country classics from fan favorites like Keith Urban, Carrie Underwood and more. Listen CMT EdgeTake a walk on the wild side with tracks from the new-and-now voices of country music. Listen […]

 Dustin Johnson

Scientology ‘tried to silence star’s accusers’

Scientology ‘tried to silence victims’ of That 70s Show star Danny Mastersonhttps://securepubads.g.doubleclick.net/tag/js/gpt.js=0;i–){var n=o[i];if(p===n.name){return n}}return undefined}function g(){if(k){if(k.getEntriesByType){return k.getEntriesByType(“mark”)}else{if(k.webkitGetEntriesByType){return k.webkitGetEntriesByType(“mark”)}}}return a}return{mark:b,measure:m,gaMarks:a,gaMeasures:d}})();LUX.ns=(Date.now?Date.now():+(new Date()));LUX.ac=[];LUX.cmd=function(a){LUX.ac.push(a)};LUX.init=function(){LUX.cmd([“init”])};LUX.send=function(){LUX.cmd([“send”])};LUX.addData=function(a,b){LUX.cmd([“addData”,a,b])};LUX_ae=[];window.addEventListener(“error”,function(a){LUX_ae.push(a)});LUX_al=[];if(“function”===typeof(PerformanceObserver)&&”function”===typeof(PerformanceLongTaskTiming)){var LongTaskObserver=new PerformanceObserver(function(c){var b=c.getEntries();for(var a=0;ahttps://cdn.speedcurve.com/js/lux.js?id=338391603 That 70s Show star Danny Masterson’s rape trial has heard about the Church of Scientology’s reaction to his alleged victims. Church of Scientology officials tried to keep women who were allegedly […]